ADHD and Language Impairments

Is there a connection?
This study was carried out in collaboration between the University of Bergen and the University of Linköping in Sweden. It was published in the Journal of Attention Disorders.
Full article: www.sciencenordic.com,
Many parents and teachers find that their ADHD child or student has an accompanying language impairment too. We often witness these children struggle to express themselves verbally or in written language. They often speak in bits and pieces while failing to understand the content of conversations. Issuing multiple step directions is confusing to the child.Researcher and Speech Therapist Wenche Andersen Helland of Helse Fonna and Statped Vest in Bergen, Norway conducted research on the language skills of ADHD children. According to www.sciencenordic.com, Helland led a clinical study of 59 children aged 6-12, which showed that kids with ADHD have a poorer understanding of language in social situations than children their age without the disorder – healthy children. Helland also researched over 5600 children aged 7 – 9 and found the same language deficits.

“There is often a one-sided focus on the behavior of kids with ADHD. But these children may have communication problems as they grow older, particularly in a school situation, if their language skills are not given enough attention,” says Helland.

“If we don’t work hard enough to strengthen language development in children with ADHD, we increase the risk that they won’t learn what they should in school.”

“They’ll also be more likely to fall short in social interactions with
their peers. We need to intervene early to prevent a downward spiral,” adds Helland.

This finding may be related to the social difficulties many ADHD children encounter.

Hellen thinks that ADHD children should have their language skills assessed as well, and schools should be notified of the results to provide services if necessary.

This study was carried out in collaboration between the University of Bergen and the University of Linköping in Sweden. It was published in the Journal of Attention Disorders.

Photo: ADHD and Language Impairments<br />
Is there a connection?</p>
<p>Many parents and teachers find that their ADHD child or student has an accompanying language impairment too. We often witness these children struggle to express themselves verbally or in written language. They often speak in bits and pieces while failing to understand the content of conversations. Issuing multiple step directions is confusing to the child. </p>
<p>Researcher and Speech Therapist Wenche Andersen Helland of Helse Fonna and Statped Vest in Bergen, Norway conducted research on the language skills of ADHD children. According to www.sciencenordic.com, Helland  led a clinical study of 59 children aged 6-12, which showed that kids with ADHD have a poorer understanding of language in social situations than children their age without the disorder - healthy children. Helland also researched over 5600 children aged 7 - 9 and found the same language deficits. </p>
<p>“There is often a one-sided focus on the behavior of kids with ADHD. But these children may have communication problems as they grow older, particularly in a school situation, if their language skills are not given enough attention,” says Helland.</p>
<p>“If we don't work hard enough to strengthen language development in children with ADHD, we increase the risk that they won't learn what they should in school.”</p>
<p>“They’ll also be more likely to fall short in social interactions with<br />
their peers. We need to intervene early to prevent a downward spiral,” adds Helland.</p>
<p>This finding may be related to the social difficulties many ADHD children encounter. </p>
<p>Hellen thinks that ADHD children should have their language skills assessed as well, and schools should be notified of the results to provide services if necessary.</p>
<p>This study was carried out in collaboration between the University of Bergen and the University of Linköping in Sweden. It was published in the Journal of Attention Disorders.