Are You a Better Parent if You’re Medicated?

Are You a Better Parent if You’re Medicated?
Penn State researchers say YES!

Read More: http://news.psu.edu/story/321808/2014/07/30/research/parenting-skills-improve-adhd-parents-medication

Penn State News reports on a small study done at Penn State and funded by Shire Inc., the manufacturer of lisdexamfetamine, (aka Vyvanse) where ADHD parents received medication to help them cope with their children.

One of the lead researchers, Dr. James Waxmonsky noted, “Parents with ADHD are at increased risk to engage in problematic parenting techniques, including inconsistent disciplinary practices, making ineffectual commands and diminished use of praise. Having a parent with ADHD also decreases the chances that children with ADHD will respond to typically effective medication or counseling treatment.”

So, the solution? Medicate the parents! The researchers selected 20 parents who had children age 5 to 12. Both parents had a diagnosis presenting ADHD. The researchers then gave the parents ‘optimal’ doses of lisdexamfetamine (Vyvanse).

The parents were then brought to the clinic for observation on two tasks: 1] The child performs homework with parental assistance, and 2] The child plays while the parent performs paperwork.

The parent was administered either a placebo or Vyvanse for the first observation. This was then reversed for the second observation period. Neither the researchers nor participants knew when the active medication was received.

According to Penn State News, “The results of the first phase showed no medication effect was seen during the homework component. During the non-academic component, parents were less likely to make negative statements toward their children on lisdexamfetamine than on placebo.

Children showed less inappropriate behavior during the homework task when their parent was prescribed lisdexamfetamine versus placebo.

Then, in the second phase, parents had a 50 percent chance of staying on active medication or a 50 percent chance of being switched to placebo for the remainder of the study. They completed the same parent-child interaction tasks as in the first phase.”

“In the laboratory setting, lisdexamfetamine treatment of parental ADHD was associated with significant reductions in children’s negative behaviors and improvements in parenting behaviors found to be adversely impacted by ADHD,” Waxmonsky said.

Can you think of a better way to expand this market?