Strong Parental Goals & The ADHD Child

You can make a big difference

Read the full article: http://consumer.healthday.com/kids-health-information-23/attention-deficit-disorder-adhd-news-50/parents-goals-guide-adhd-treatment-choice-679759.html

A study published in the September 2 issue of Pediatrics reports that parents who set strong goals for their ADHD children can greatly influence outcomes. The study’s lead author, Alexander G. Fiks, M.D., of the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, proposes that parents share decision making with their doctors.

Fiks found that parents most concerned with behavioral improvement were more likely to implement behavioral therapy. Parents who were more concerned with academic
achievement were twice as likely to start their children on medication.

“The results of our study highlight the importance of parents’ priorities for their child–improved academic achievement, behavior or interpersonal relationships–in determining what treatment they ultimately choose for their child’s ADHD,” Fiks told 2 Minute Medicine™. Fiks advised parents to have their pediatricians describe all their treatment options including both the positive and negative aspects of each treatment.

This study reveals the current culture of ADHD; if we want to improve grades, we offer medication which has consistently been shown not to improve academic outcomes over the long-term. It frequently does improve grades near term.

Behavioral therapy is always a good course of action, but it does not address cognitive skills that will insure success at school, home, and with friends.

Play Attention addresses cognitive skills, behavioral shaping, and attention training. 800.788.6786

ADHD, Does Age Have Anything to Do with It?

Reported in the December issue of Pediatrics.
Full artilce: http://www.healio.com/pediatrics/add-adhd/news/online/%7Bc94e8137-0890-4175-99e9-b69e02fb9fb0%7D/youngest-children-in-class-more-often-treated-for-adhd

The December issue of Pediatrics reports the results of an Icelandic study on ADHD, age, and prescription medication. The researchers found that the youngest kids in the class may have a tougher time with academics and behavior.

The youngest third of their fourth-grade class were almost twice as likely to score low on math and language arts standardized tests and were also 50 percent more likely to be prescribed stimulants for ADHD by seventh grade.

“Birthday cutoffs for school entry necessarily lead to an age span of at least 12 months within a classroom. At age 5, this span accounts for 20 percent of the child’s age and presents a difference in maturity and performance between the youngest and the oldest child in class,” said lead researcher Helga Zoëga of Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City.

Academics improved on medication, but the researchers cautioned that these measures may only partially predict long-term academic and psychiatric outcomes. Other studies have shown no improvement socially, academically, or behaviorally over the long-term.

A large U.S. study published last year showed double the risk of diagnosis or treatment for ADHD in children born in the 4 months prior to the school eligibility age cutoff.

Thus, the question is, do we hold these students back a year so their brain and body become ready for school, or medicate them and thrust them into the school environment?

www.playattention.com 800.788.6786

Photo: ADHD, Does Age Have Anything to Do with It?</p>
<p>The December issue of Pediatrics reports the results of an Icelandic study on ADHD, age, and prescription medication. The researchers found that the youngest kids in the class may have a tougher time with academics and behavior.</p>
<p>The youngest third of their fourth-grade class were almost twice as likely to score low on math and language arts standardized tests and were also 50 percent more likely to be prescribed stimulants for ADHD by seventh grade.</p>
<p>"Birthday cutoffs for school entry necessarily lead to an age span of at least 12 months within a classroom. At age 5, this span accounts for 20 percent of the child's age and presents a difference in maturity and performance between the youngest and the oldest child in class," said lead researcher Helga Zoëga of Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City.</p>
<p>Academics improved on medication, but the researchers cautioned that these measures may only partially predict long-term academic and psychiatric outcomes. Other studies have shown no improvement socially, academically, or behaviorally over the long-term. </p>
<p>A large U.S. study published last year showed double the risk of diagnosis or treatment for ADHD in children born in the 4 months prior to the school eligibility age cutoff.</p>
<p>Thus, the question is, do we hold these students back a year so their brain and body become ready for school, or medicate them and thrust them into the school environment?</p>
<p>www.playattention.com  800.788.6786