Study Says Most Doctors Don’t Follow ADHD Treatment Guidelines for Preschoolers

Does yours?

Published in the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)

Study presented Saturday at the Pediatric Academic Societies’ annual meeting in Washington, D.C.
author Dr. Andrew Adesman

Read full article: http://www.webmd.com/add-adhd/childhood-adhd/news/20130504/most-docs-dont-follow-adhd-treatment-guidelines-for-preschoolers-study

New treatment guidelines were published recently by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). These guidelines now allow for an ADHD diagnosis in children as young as 4-years old. The new guidelines are somewhat controversial because three out of the four common medications used to treat ADHD patients are not FDA approved for use among children that young.

Much like the guidelines in the United Kingdom, the new AAP guidelines recommend that behavior therapy be the first treatment approach for preschoolers with ADHD. Treatment with medication is a last resort option used when behavior-management is unsuccessful.

A study presented Saturday at the Pediatric Academic Societies’ annual meeting in Washington, D.C. reports that about 90% of the pediatric specialists who diagnose and treat preschool children do not follow those treatment guidelines. According to study author Dr. Andrew Adesman, chief of behavioral pediatrics at Cohen Children’s Medical Center in New Hyde Park, NY, some pediatric specialists prescribe medication too soon and some do not offer them as a second line treatment.

In a medical center news release, Adesman noted, “It is unclear why so many physicians who specialize in the management of ADHD — child neurologists, psychiatrists and developmental pediatricians — fail to comply with recently published treatment guidelines.”