Should Doctors Prescribe ADHD Drugs as Neuro-enahncements?

Paper released by: William D. Graf, M.D., of Yale University in New Haven, Conn., and colleagues, on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology, Child Neurology Society, and American Neurological Association.
Full text: http://www.neurology.org/content/early/2013/03/13/WNL.0b013e318289703b.full.pdf+html

Pediatric neuroenhancement
www.neurology.org
A statement paper advises against

Parents want the best for their children. Since ADHD stimulant meds tend to improve memory and attention in all users, some parents think giving them to a healthy child will enhance the child’s performance. Give them an edge so to speak.

William D. Graf, M.D., of Yale University in New Haven, Conn., and colleagues, on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology, Child Neurology Society, and American Neurological Association, released a position paper on the implications of ADHD drug use for enhancement. They argue that the ethical, legal, and neurodevelopmental implications are far to great to prescribe ADHD drugs for neuro-enhancements.

“Doctors caring for children and teens have a professional obligation to always protect the best interests of the child, to protect vulnerable populations, and prevent the misuse of medication. The practice of prescribing these drugs, called neuroenhancements, for healthy students is not justifiable,” Graf said in a statement. “The physician should talk to the child about the request, as it may reflect other medical, social, or psychological motivations such as anxiety, depression, or insomnia. There are alternatives to neuroenhancements available, including maintaining good sleep, nutrition, study habits, and exercise regimens.”

Full text: http://www.neurology.org/content/early/2013/03/13/WNL.0b013e318289703b.full.pdf+html

Pediatric neuroenhancement
www.neurology.org