ADHD and Smoking Later in Life

Is there a connection?
Full article reported: http://health.usnews.com/health-news/news/articles/2012/10/30/gene-may-be-tied-to-both-smoking-and-adhd-study-suggests

New research published online in the journal Archives of Disease in Childhood (Oct. 29, 2012) says that childhood ADHD may increase the likelihood of smoking later in life.

The researchers examined blood samples from 450 ADHD children aged 6 to 12 years, their siblings, and parents. The samples were tested for genetic variations strongly associated with smoking attributes. These included:

1. The number of cigarettes smoked every day.
2. Starting smoking.
3. Quitting smoking.
4. Times of smoking.

The researchers also asked the mothers about their smoking habits during pregnancy. The data indicated that ADHD people are more likely to start smoking early and to smoke twice as much as those without ADHD.

This research is similar to research indicating a relationship between ADHD and drug use in later life.

Although the study found an association between the genetic variant and ADHD and smoking behaviors, it did not prove a cause-and-effect relationship so further research is necessary.

However, even without a cause-effect relationship, the data need to be heeded. Start early prevention.

Call Play Attention. 800.788.6786.

Photo: ADHD and Smoking Later in Life<br />
Is there a connection?</p>
<p>New research  published online in the journal Archives of Disease in Childhood (Oct. 29) says that childhood ADHD may increase the likelihood of smoking later in life.</p>
<p>The researchers examined blood samples from 450 ADHD children aged 6 to 12 years, their siblings, and parents. The samples were tested for genetic variations strongly associated with smoking attributes. These included:</p>
<p>1. The number of cigarettes smoked every day.<br />
2. Starting smoking.<br />
3. Quitting smoking.<br />
4. Times of smoking.</p>
<p>The researchers also asked the mothers about their smoking habits during pregnancy. The data indicated that ADHD people are more likely to start smoking early and to smoke twice as much as those without ADHD. </p>
<p>This research is similar to research indicating a relationship between ADHD and drug use in later life. </p>
<p>Although the study found an association between the genetic variant and ADHD and smoking behaviors, it did not prove a cause-and-effect relationship so further research is necessary. </p>
<p>However, even without a cause-effect relationship, the data need to be heeded. Start early prevention. </p>
<p>Call Play Attention. 800.788.6786.