ADHD and Increased Risk for Substance Abuse

ADHD and Increased Risk for Substance Abuse
Fact or fiction?

Read More: http://www.uvm.edu/medicine/?Page=news&storyID=13651&category=comall

Research published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child Adolescent Psychiatry reports that children with ADHD may be at significant risk for later substance abuse.

More than 600 children were followed over eight years. Those children diagnosed with ADHD at baseline (average of 8.5 years), had significantly higher rates of substance regardless of their sex 6 to 8 years later compared with their age-matched peers who did not have ADHD.

“Medication for ADHD did not protect from, or contribute to, visible risk of substance use or SUD by adolescence,” write the investigators.

“We Need to Do Better…However, similar to managing high blood pressure or obesity, there are nonmedical things we can do to decrease the risk of a bad outcome,” said Dr. Molina, one of the study’s authors.

“As researchers and practitioners, we need to do a better job of helping parents and schools address these risk factors that are so common for children with ADHD.

This echoes previous research by doctors Robert Whelan and Hugh Garavan of the University of Vermont and a cohort of international researchers.

Their report published in the journal Nature Neuroscience (online April 29, 2012) helps answer whether particular brain patterns are caused by drug use or established before drug use. Professors Whelan and Garavan found that certain networks in some teenagers cause a higher risk for experimentation with drugs and alcohol – simply because their brains are wired differently making the teens more impulsive.

A teenager exposed to peer pressure regarding smoking a joint or drinking alcohol, provided parental boundaries and structure have been set, would refuse the offer whild the teenager with lesser orbitofrontal control would likely say, “Yeah, gimme, gimme, gimme!” says Garavan, “and this other kid is saying, ‘no, I’m not going to do that.'”

ADHD Linked to Teen Obesity

Could ADHD make your teen fat?

Read More: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/03/10/adhd-increase-risk-of-obesity_n_4921150.html

In new research published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 7,000 children in Finland were studied to determine whether ADHD symptoms at age eight were linked to greater chances of being obese by age 16.

The results showed that children who had ADHD symptoms at a young age were nearly twice as likely to be obese as teens. This was true even after taking into account childhood weight.

“In general, people think of children with hyperactivity as moving around a lot and therefore should be slim,” senior author Alina Rodriguez said. However, “Children with ADHD are not more likely to participate in physical activity, as we show in our report.”

Previous studies have demonstrated a link between obesity and ADHD, yet the exact cause remains undetermined.

Children today often spend a lot of time indoors and in front of a screen whether it’s TV phone, or computer. Research has shown that the greater the time spent in front a screen, the greater likelihood the child will be obese and have decreased academic performance.

Secondly, ADHD children often lack social skills and by middle school, this becomes readily apparent. They tend to isolate themselves from other children who may ridicule them. Impulse control and lack of social skills may keep them away from team sports. So it’s important to help them select an activity that they can excel in. Individual sports like martial arts, swimming, or tennis can be great avenues to physical fitness and better self-esteem.

ADHD and Increased Risk for Substance Abuse

Fact or fiction?
Published in the December Journal of the American Academy of Child Adolescent Psychiatry
Research published in the December Journal of the American Academy of Child Adolescent Psychiatry reports that children with ADHD may be at significant risk for later substance abuse. This reflects previous research.

More than 600 children were followed over eight years. Those children diagnosed with ADHD at baseline average of 8.5 years), had significantly higher rates of substance regardless of their sex 6 to 8 years later compared with their age-matched peers who did not have ADHD.

“Medication for ADHD did not protect from, or contribute to, visible risk of substance use or SUD by adolescence,” write the investigators.

“We Need to Do Better…However, similar to managing high blood pressure or obesity, there are non-medical things we can do to decrease the risk of a bad outcome,” said Dr. Molina, one of the study’s authors.

“As researchers and practitioners, we need to do a better job of helping parents and schools address these risk factors that are so common for children with ADHD.

Read the full article: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/779755

Resources: Dr. Molina, one of the study’s authors.