More Women Diagnosed with ADHD Now

More Women Diagnosed with ADHD Now
Is it life, work, or something else entirely?

Read More: http://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/2012/08/girls-adhd.aspx

You can’t keep track of the kids and your spouse. Your house is in total disarray. Your mind can’t stay focused on anything for more than a few seconds. If this is your life, don’t feel alone; more women are being diagnosed with ADHD than ever before.

Women who are diagnosed later in life often think their messiness, lack of focus, and poor organization are just habits they learned over the years, but it could be much more serious than that.

“The number of Americans taking attention deficit hyperactivity disorder medicines rose 36% in 2012 from 2008, led by a surge among women, according to drug-benefits manager Express Scripts Holding Co.

Use of the medications grew 85 percent in 2012 from 2008 for women ages 26 to 34, and women 19 and over now outnumber men in use of the medicines, according to the report released yesterday.” (Source Newsday).

How does one explain the incredible increase in ADHD medication use especially among women ages 26 to 34? Is it due to increased stress? The demands of home and work? Better marketing among these women? Can a pill fix these problems?

Boys are diagnosed far more often than girls.In some areas of the country boys are diagnosed 5:1 over girls. Many experts attribute this to boys being more boisterous; they express frustration and act out far more than girls. Of course, the squeaky wheel gets the grease, so more boys are diagnosed than girls. Additionally, the majority of tests for ADHD were developed for hyperactive white males, so girls were by standard, omitted from that group.

Girls are often told they just aren’t performing up to par. They hear remarks from teachers like, “Stop daydreaming,” or “Get organized.” But many times it’s not just a matter of organization or daydreaming. Their ADHD just doesn’t get diagnosed until they are older. By then, their world may seem like it’s falling apart.

According to the American Psychological Association, “Young women diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder as girls, particularly the type with early signs of impulsivity, were three to four times more likely to attempt suicide and two to three times more likely to report injuring themselves than comparable young women in a control group, according to the findings, published online in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology®.”

“ADHD can signal future psychological problems for girls as they are entering adulthood,” said the study’s lead author, Stephen Hinshaw, PhD, a psychology professor at the University of California, Berkeley. “Our findings reinforce the idea that ADHD in girls is particularly severe and can have serious public health implications.”

Recent research has also shown that menopause can produce ADHD like symptoms due to hormonal changes.

The more you understand your life, the better you can manage it, but it won’t happen without you becoming your own best advocate. Don’t wait until depression sets in. Don’t wait until you feel like your life is out of control or falling apart.

Does ADHD Mean I Have Less Attention?

Does ADHD Mean I Have Less Attention?
You’ll be surprised by the answer

It’s ADHD Awareness Month. Spread the word.

Read More: http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/attention-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder-adhd/index.shtml

ADHD key symptoms include inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. It is normal for all children to exhibit these behaviors, but for children with ADHD, these behaviors are more severe and occur more often. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, a child must have symptoms for 6 or more months and to a degree that is greater than other children of the same age.

But do children with ADHD really have less attention than their peers? Attention deficit is actually a misnomer of sorts; ADHD children do not have less attention or a ‘deficit’ of attention. Actually their attention is quite substantial, however their ability to direct it or manage it at will is very difficult.

Try to imagine this: four television stations playing in your mind at one time. A lot of information is pouring in, but it’s difficult for you to pay attention to any one thing for very long. That’s the typical mind of an ADHD person. Thus, their attention is not deficit, but it is fleeting; it’s directed quickly from one thing to another.

Think of it like this: you enter a cave with a flashlight (the flashlight will serve as a metaphor for attention). It’s very dark, but you very carefully shine the flashlight in the cave, directing it on the floor to carefully navigate. Your ADHD child enters the same cave with that same flashlight. He constantly shines it all over the cave as he walks forward. So, it’s clear, same flashlight (same attention), but his is scattered or diffused.

Now you know why he’ll walk through the living room time after time and bang his shin or knee on the same coffee table for years.

Now you know why, when you ask him to go to his bedroom, put on his pajamas, and get ready for bed, you find him sitting on his bed a half hour later playing a Game-boy. He processed the, “Go to your bedroom” part. His brain is not yet equipped to process multiple step directions. When that happens in school, it’s a mess.

But why can they play their Xbox or Play Station for hours on end? I literally have to yank the controller from my son’s hand to get him to come to dinner. A characteristic of ADHD is hyperfocus, the ability to tune out everything else and attend to only a particularly engaging stimulus. Video games use high intensity graphics and sound and are loaded with action. Your ADHD child’s mind is tuned for this type of stimulation. They can hyperfocus on this for hours on end. Unfortunately, your classroom teacher cannot compete on this level. As we’ve mentioned before, limit the use of high intensity video games.

Knowing your child’s mind is integral to understanding your child’s behavior. At times they may not respond to your demands and it creates a conflict, but it’s not due to defiance necessarily. It’s often due to the way they process or don’t process information. Knowing this can reduce your conflicts and improve your family life.

Can ADHD Meds Boost Grades?

Can ADHD Meds Boost Grades?
What the long-term data reveal may surprise you
Read More:
In June, the National Bureau of Economic Research published a study that examined ADHD medication usage over 11 years and the educational outcomes of nearly 4,000 students in Quebec. The researchers found that boys who took ADHD drugs actually performed worse in school than those with a similar number of symptoms who didn’t take meds.According to the Wall Street Journal, “The possibility that [medication] won’t help them [in school] needs to be acknowledged and needs to be closely monitored,” says economics professor Janet Currie, an author on the paper and director of the Center for Health & Wellbeing, a health policy institute at Princeton University. Kids may not get the right dose to see sustained benefits, or they may stop taking the medication because side effects or other drawbacks outweigh the benefits, she says.A central question puzzles those researching ADHD: If its drugs demonstrably improve attention, focus and self-control, why wouldn’t grades improve as well?The medication’s ability to improve concentration and attention may even backfire when it comes to studying.

Martha Farah, a cognitive neuroscientist at the University of Pennsylvania who sits on the American Academy of Neurology committee that is drafting new treatment guidelines, recalls a student saying that after she takes her medication, she heads to the library. If she keeps her head down and studies, she gets very absorbed in her work and accomplishes a tremendous amount. But if a friend stops by, she becomes equally engrossed in the chat. Many students report they find themselves absorbed in cleaning their rooms rather than studying.

The National Bureau of Economic Research is a non-profit organization without any agenda on ADHD.

http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/2014/09/too-many-children-diagnosed-with-adhd/index.htm

Your Kid Might Be Taking an ADHD Drug He Doesn’t Need – Consumer Reports
www.consumerreports.org
Too many children are diagnosed with ADHD, Consumer Reports says. Find out why many kids may…

 

New Study Show Stimulant Meds Increase Cardiovascular Events

New Study Show Stimulant Meds Increase Cardiovascular Events
What every parent should know

Read More: http://consumer.healthday.com/kids-health-information-23/adolescents-and-teen-health-news-719/adhd-drugs-may-up-risk-of-heart-problems-689468.html

 

(HealthDay News) — Stimulant use in children and adolescents is associated with an increased risk of a subsequent cardiovascular event, according to a study published online June 23 in the Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology.

Søren Dalsgaard, MD, PhD, from Aarhus University in Denmark, and colleagues conducted a longitudinal prospective study of all children born in Denmark from 1990–1999. The authors sought to examine whether stimulant users are at increased risk of a subsequent cardiovascular event. Data were collected from national health registers on psychiatric and somatic diagnoses, stimulant prescriptions, cardiovascular risk factors, and pre- and perinatal and sociodemographic covariates. Data were merged for children and their parents.

Using data for a total population of 714,258 children, contributing 6,767,982 person-years, the researchers found that stimulant use correlated with an increased risk of a cardiovascular event (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.83). Stimulant treatment also increased the risk of a cardiovascular event in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD; 8,300 children; adjusted hazard ratio, 2.20), with evidence of a complex time-dependent, dose-response association.

“Cardiovascular events were rare but twice as likely in stimulant users as in nonusers, both in the total national population and in children with ADHD,” the authors write. “Our results suggest a safety signal with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease associated with stimulant treatment in children and adolescents, even after adjusting for a number of potential confounders.”

ADHD ‘Inextricably’ Linked to Substance Abuse

New study says parents beware

Abstract: http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/134/1/e293.abstract

The journal Pediatrics published a study (June 30) which found that children with ADHD are 2 times more likely to meet diagnostic criteria for alcohol abuse or dependence and more than 2.5 times more likely to develop a substance use disorder (SUD). Additionally, ADHD children are twice as likely to develop cocaine abuse or dependence.

Is there any good news? The researchers noted that stimulant medication may reduce the risk for trying drugs and developing an SUD. Prior studies both contradict and confirm this.

The study’s authors warn, “Individuals with co-occurring ADHD and active SUDs require a careful, individual risk/benefit assessment regarding the safety of prescribing a stimulant medication. Longer acting preparations of stimulant medication, the prodrug formulation of dextroamphetamine, and nonstimulant medications for ADHD all have lower abuse potential than short-acting preparations of stimulant medication and, thus, their use should be strongly considered if there is a high risk of misuse, diversion, or abuse of stimulant medications.”

“Misuse and diversion of stimulant medications are more widespread problems than abuse or addiction,” the report states. What is diversion? Diversion is your child not using the medication as prescribed, but rather selling it to someone else.

The report indicates that prior research suggests that between 16% and 23% of school-aged children are approached to sell, buy, or trade their stimulant medication.

Surge in women taking drugs for ADHD

Surge in women taking drugs for ADHD
What’s behind this?

From Newsday: http://www.newsday.com/news/health/surge-in-women-taking-drugs-for-adhd-1.7372481

“The number of Americans taking attention deficit hyperactivity disorder medicines rose 36% in 2012 from 2008, led by a surge among women, according to drug-benefits manager Express Scripts Holding Co.

Use of the medications grew 85 percent in 2012 from 2008 for women ages 26 to 34, and women 19 and over now outnumber men in use of the medicines, according to the report released yesterday. Boys 12 to 18 years old are the most heavily prescribed, with about 9.3 percent on ADHD drugs in 2012.

Almost 4.8 million privately insured people were on ADHD medicines in 2012, the report said. Those with the disorder have problems paying attention, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says.”

How does one explain the incredible increase in ADHD medication use especially among women ages 26 to 34? Is it due to increased stress? The demands of home and work? Better marketing among these women? Can a pill fix these problems?

Your opinions are welcome.

Toddlers Being Prescribed ADHD Meds

Toddlers Being Prescribed ADHD Meds

Read more: http://www.inquisitr.com/1259397/cdc-finds-shocking-number-of-toddlers-medicated-for-adhd-medicaid-recipients-especially-vulnerable/

The Centers for Disease Control reports that Medicaid claims in Georgia reveal 1 in 225 toddlers are medicated for ADHD – that’s 760 cases in the state alone. The CDC estimates that more than 10,000 toddlers may be taking ADHD medications.

Dr. Lawrence H. Diller, a behavioral pediatrician in Walnut Creek, Calif. and author of The Last Normal Child said, “People prescribing to 2-year-olds are just winging it. It is outside the standard of care, and they should be subject to malpractice if something goes wrong with a kid.”

Dr. Ed Hallowell, a noted child psychiatrist and ADHD expert appeared on Fox and Friends. He said it’s “crazy” that toddlers are being given drugs like Adderall and Ritalin.

“People are looking for a quick solution to the age-old problem of rambunctious little toddlers,” he said. “The solution is not to give them medication. The solution is to play with them, to be with them, to take care of them. Not to give them a pill in the hopes
that’ll quiet them down.”

Prescriptions for toddlers are being granted despite the fact that ADHD medication has not been studied for this group. Indeed the American Academy of Pediatrics does not even broach the subject of ADHD medication in toddlers (children under 4 years old).

Two year olds are notably rambunctious. Most experts agree that it’s far too early to diagnose ADHD at age 2. Your opinions are welcome.

Concerta Placed on FDA’s Watch List

Concerta Placed on FDA’s Watch List
Read More: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/823917

Medscape reports that on April 21, 2014 the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has placed a generic drug that treats attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) on its latest quarterly list of products to monitor because of potential health risks, the agency announced today.

In the case of the ADHD drug — certain generic versions of methylphenidate hydrochloride (Concerta, Janssen Pharmaceuticals) — the issue is a possible lack of therapeutic effect, which may be linked to product quality issues, according to the FDA.

A drug’s appearance on the list, which grows quarter by quarter, does not mean the FDA has concluded that the drug actually poses the health risk reported through FAERS. Instead, the agency is studying whether there is indeed a causal link. If it establishes one, the FDA then would consider a regulatory response such as gathering more information to better describe the risk, changing the drug’s label, or mandating a risk evaluation and mitigation strategy.

The FDA also emphasizes that it is not suggesting that clinicians should stop prescribing watch list drugs or that patients should stop taking them while the jury is out.

More Drugs Added to FDA Watch List
www.medscape.com
Members of a certain class of cancer drugs, as well as a drug treating ADHD, made the list on the basis of potential signals of health risks.

ADHD Drugs Affect Growth Rates

ADHD Drugs Affect Growth Rates
Obesity? Weight loss? Both?

Read more: http://www.imt.ie/clinical/2014/04/adhd-treatment-drugs-affect-bmi-growth-rates.html

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health finds that ADHD children treated with stimulant medication initially have slower body mass index (BMI) growth than their untreated peers. BMI is a measure of body fat based on height and weight. But, that’s just the tip of the iceberg.

The researchers found that the slow growth of BMI was followed by a rapid rebound of BMI that was greater than that of children with no history of ADHD or stimulant medication use and that could continue to obesity.

The researchers found that the earlier the medication was given coupled with the longer the medication was taken resulted in slower BMI growth in earlier childhood but then the more rapid the BMI rebound in late adolescence, typically after medication was discontinued. Researchers concluded that stimulant use, and not a diagnosis of ADHD, was associated with higher BMI and obesity.

“Our findings should motivate greater attention to the possibility that longer-term stimulant use plays a role in the development of obesity in children,” said study lead, Prof . Brian Schwartz of Environmental Health Sciences, Epidemiology and Medicine at the Bloomberg School of Public Health. “Given the dramatic rise in ADHD diagnosis and stimulant treatment in recent decades, this is an interesting avenue of research regarding the childhood obesity epidemic, because the rises in each of these roughly parallel one another.”

Earlier research has noted decreased appetite and weight loss as being associated with stimulant medication use. This is the first comprehensive study to find low BMI rebounding to obesity even after discontinuation of the drug.

Many stimulants used to control ADHD symptoms were once used or initially invented as weight loss drugs.

Stroke Risk and ADHD Meds

Is there a link?

Read More: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140212183652.htm,

Black label warnings on ADHD medications range from weight loss, risk of heart complications, to various other maladies. However, according to the American Heart Association, a study presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2014 reports that children who take medication to treat ADHD do not appear to be at increased stroke risk.

The study analyzed data of 2.5 million 2- to 19-year-olds over a 14-year period. The researchers compared stimulant medication usage in children diagnosed with ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke to stimulant usage in children without stroke. The researchers found no association between stroke risk and the use of ADHD stimulant medications at the time of stroke or at any time prior to stroke.